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The Truth About American Prison Camps
History Movies Endorsed by Sioux Falls Free Thinkers

Sioux Falls Free Thinkers recommend the movies below on the Truth About American Prison Camps.

Case in point. Americans murdered about 3 million innocent civilians in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. The people there were basically farmers who lived in bamboo huts and bamboo houses and whose great dream was to get a water buffalo to ease their labor in the their rice paddies and rice fields. They had no defense against our bombs, and especially not against our napalm bombs which we used to burn entire villages sending every man, woman, child, elderly person and baby to a horrible death. Once napalm lands on you it just burns through you. Imagine the horror and pain of a innocent child whose arm or leg is burning off in front of his or her eyes. We also murdered without trial 25,000 of the Vietnamese people as spies in operation Phoenix. We even lined up villagers in ditches and slaughtered women and children just like the Nazi's did in Europe. The people of Vietnam couldn't tell the difference between us and the Nazi's. We did many of the same things.

To the above atrocities add Agent Orange, unexploded bombs and artillery shells, and the cluster bombs for kids. Agent Orange is still causing birth defects and birth deformities in South East Asia forty-five years later. Unexploded ordnance still buried makes it impossible to use much of the best farm land, and children still pick up the cute little toys with the Mickey Mouse faces and get their hands or faces blown off. If this happened to us in America do you think we'd ever forgive and forget? Not likely!

These people were not a threat in any way to the United States or our interests. What were they going to do? Ride across the Pacific Ocean on their water buffalo and invade us? But we had the power to murder them in large numbers so murder them we did. All in the name of stopping the spread of communism, which was hardly going to spread to America across the Pacific. We never seem to learn that mass killing of a people stiffens their resolve. The Nazi's learned that in Russia. The South East Asians would rather have all died than give in to the likes of us. And who would blame them. And how stupid can we be?

And that's just recently. Add to that Iraq, a completely unjustified war. The Philippines in the early 20th century, with it's own set of American atrocities there. The support of the South American dictatorships and the training of their death squads by the CIA run School of the Americas. And much much more which will be documented on this website with many books and movie documentaries. You just have to open your eyes and mind and say "No More!" because if you don't America will do it all again to more innocent people someplace else.

1-4-17 Donald Trump says Guantanamo Bay releases must end
Donald Trump says Guantanamo Bay releases must end
US President-elect Donald Trump says there must be no further releases of detainees from the Guantanamo Bay detention centre in Cuba. He said those left were "extremely dangerous people and should not be allowed back onto the battlefield". President Barack Obama had vowed to close the jail during his tenure and has transferred out many prisoners. Around 60 inmates remain and the White House said later on Tuesday it expected more transfers before 20 January. Mr Trump had opposed Mr Obama's closure plan during the presidential election campaign. Last February he said: "This morning, I watched President Obama talking about Gitmo, right, Guantanamo Bay, which by the way, which by the way, we are keeping open. "Which we are keeping open... and we're gonna load it up with some bad dudes, believe me, we're gonna load it up." (Webmaster's comment: American's very own torture and death camp. Trump and Hitler would be proud! Our nation's leaders will be beyond redemption!)

12-26-16 How Pearl Harbor changed Japanese-Americans
How Pearl Harbor changed Japanese-Americans
The attack on Pearl Harbor shaped the lives of Japanese-Americans long after World War Two ended. As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visits Hawaii, the internment and treatment of Japanese-Americans during the war continues to resonate in today's political landscape. When US President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stood together in Hiroshima in late May, they made history: President Obama became the first sitting US president to visit the site of the US atomic bomb attack. On Tuesday they are set to reunite for another historic visit - Pearl Harbor. When Japanese attacked the US naval base on 7 December 1941, the rest of the world was already at war. Shortly after, the US joined the Allied forces. More than 50 million soldiers and civilians were killed, making it the deadliest military conflict in history. But after Pearl Harbor there were consequences for another group: American citizens of Japanese ancestry. "The Japanese race is an enemy race," wrote Lieutenant General John DeWitt in Final Report, Japanese Evacuation from the West Coast, 1942. "While many second and third generation Japanese born on American soil, possessed of American citizenship, have become 'Americanized,' the racial strains are undiluted." In February 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, sending 120,000 people from the US west coast into internment camps because of their ethnic background. Two-thirds of them were born in America. Exclusion orders were posted in California, directing removal of persons of Japanese ancestry. (Webmaster's comment: And in Racist America this could happen again for almost any reason, but mostly because of all the haters and losers in America and their deep feelings of inadequacy.)

7-18-16 America's inescapable debtor's prison
America's inescapable debtor's prison
Today, debt plays a near-constant role in American life: We are both a nation in debt and a nation of debtors, and so, to an extent, a nation that functions as a kind of large-scale debtor's prison. Perhaps nowhere is this reality more visible than in the way the American legal system has been able to turn debt into a kind of blunt instrument. A citizen's debt will reliably generate more debt, which will, in turn, generate a reliable profit for local law enforcement, or from the private companies that get in on the action. In an incendiary article in the Harvard Law Review, Shakeer Rahman recounted the story of Tom Barrett, whose experience of the American legal system's debt labyrinth began in 2012, when he was arrested for stealing a can of beer. The debtor's prison as discrete location may no longer exist as we once knew it, but this is only because our ability to punish debtors has now spread beyond prison walls. In Tom Barrett — and the countless other citizens like him — we find the story of a citizen not just controlled by debt, but forced to finance his own incarceration. This last detail, if not the story itself, would seem all too familiar to Dickens: Two hundred years ago, the debtors at Marshalsea had to pay for their own imprisonment as well.

5-30-16 Why is Guantanamo Bay detention centre still open?
Why is Guantanamo Bay detention centre still open?
The BBC's Aleem Maqbool reports from inside Guantanamo Bay detention centre, which is still open, despite President Obama vowing to shut it down eight years ago.

6-10-16 Guantánamo’s ‘forever prisoners’
Guantánamo’s ‘forever prisoners’
President Obama came into office vowing to close the notorious prison at Guantánamo Bay. Why didn’t he succeed? There are still 80 “enemy combatants” being held at the Guantánamo Bay military detention center at the U.S. naval base in Cuba. That’s down from the total of 779 inmates imprisoned there since the Bush administration created the detention center as part of the “war on terror” in January 2002. When President Obama took office in 2009, 242 inmates remained, most of whom hadn’t been charged with a crime; days later, he signed an executive order requiring Guantánamo to be closed within the year. But Obama’s efforts to empty the facility and transfer remaining inmates to federal prisons have been stymied by adamant Republican opposition. Guantánamo correspondent Carol Rosenberg was assigned by The Miami Herald to cover the prison’s closure more than 12 years ago. “As it stands,” says Rosenberg, “it could be that we will just be waiting for the last guy to die before it closes.” (Webmaster's comment: In other words it's a DEATH CAMP just like the Nazi's had! What a travesty for a nation supposedly standing for freedom and liberty to have. Supported by your Republican legislators.)

5-27-16 The gobsmacking racism of America's criminal justice system
The gobsmacking racism of America's criminal justice system
Earlier this week the Supreme Court issued a near-unanimous ruling that the state of Georgia must retry Timothy Foster, a black death-row inmate convicted by an all-white jury of the murder of Queen Madge White, a 79-year-old white woman. Four potential African-American jurors were excluded from consideration by prosecutors, who happen to have recorded their anti-black bias in notes that came to light decades after Foster's conviction was handed down. The bigotry-in-action that these papers reveal should not, at this point in U.S. history, come as a surprise to anyone. The endemic, systemic racism that has always informed every aspect of the American criminal justice system has been documented by activists, human rights organizations, and the media in numbing detail (if to little effect). Consider for instance the fact that though African Americans comprise only some 12 percent of the general population, they make up about 42 percent of death row.

5-27-16 After a life in solitary
After a life in solitary
Albert Woodfox spent 43 years in a 6-by-9-foot concrete box, said Ed Pilkington in The Guardian (U.K.). He is one of the “Angola Three”—former Black Panther activists who were put into solitary confinement in 1972, after being convicted of fatally stabbing a prison guard at Louisiana’s notorious Angola prison. Woodfox, now 69, always insisted he was framed, and this February his conviction was overturned. Now free, Woodfox is adapting to his new life outside his cell. “Everything is new, no matter how small or large,” he says. He had a day out at a beach in Texas recently. “It was so strange, walking on the beach and all these people and kids running around. I’m not accustomed to people moving around me, and it makes me nervous. Being in a cell on my own, I only had to protect myself from attack in front of the cell, as I knew there was no one behind me. Now I’m in society, and I have to remind myself that the chances of being attacked are very small.” There are even, he admits, moments when he feels almost homesick for prison. “Human beings are territorial—they feel more comfortable in areas they are secure. In society it’s difficult, it’s looser. So there are moments when, yeah, I wish I was back in the security of a cell.” He pauses. “I mean, it does that to you.”

5-16-16 The grotesque criminalization of poverty in America
The grotesque criminalization of poverty in America
Money bail is a vast moral abomination. If you are arrested for a serious crime, you're supposed to be taken to jail and booked. Then there's some sort of hearing, and if the judge doesn't think you will skip town or commit more crimes, you are either released on your own recognizance, or you post bail, and you are free until a pre-trial hearing. After that, you either go to trial, or plead guilty and accept punishment. But for a great many people, this is not how it works. As a new report from the Prison Policy Initiative demonstrates, over one-third of people who go through the booking process end up staying in jail simply because they can't raise enough cash to post bail. For millions of Americans in 2016, poverty is effectively a crime.

5-11-16 Inside decaying US prison, former inmates are guides
Inside decaying US prison, former inmates are guides
At a 19th Century prison that pioneered the use of solitary confinement in the US, former inmates lead one-of-a-kind tours about the history of incarceration and their own experience within it. (Webmaster's comment: And we are still following these barbaric practices.)

4-28-16 Voting: The politics of including ex-felons
Voting: The politics of including ex-felons
When the racists who rewrote Virginia’s constitution in 1902 banned felons from voting, said The Washington Post in an editorial, “they made no bones about their objectives.” The changes, they said, would help “eliminate the darkey as a political factor in this State” and “ensure the complete supremacy of the white race.” More than a century later, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) has finally scrapped “the last vestige of that project”—using his executive authority to reinstate voting rights to more than 200,000 former convicted felons, the vast majority of whom are African-American. McAuliffe’s executive order, imposed over adamant opposition from Republicans, applies to all felons who have served their prison sentences and finished parole or probation. Let’s hope other states follow suit, said Janai S. Nelson in NYTimes.com. An estimated 5.85 million Americans who’ve served their time on felony convictions are banned from participating in our democracy because of discriminatory voting laws—when really we should be trying to reintegrate these people back into society. (Webmaster's comment: If you've done your time, paid for your crime, then ALL rights should be fully restored.)

2-8-16 This is what it's like to get in a prison fight
This is what it's like to get in a prison fight
Fighting in prison is bloody, brutal, and ubiquitous. A prison fight is nothing like the UFC or boxing. It's straight-up bedlam. Anything that can happen, will happen. Locks in a sock, shanks, and mop wringers are all game. You can't get a fair fight, but you can get a square one. You just have to know the rules. And the rules vary. The universal rule is that fighting is part of prison life. You either fight or lose everything. Heart checks are mandatory. It's called being "on the count" and if you aren't present, you'll get checked into the hole by your own boys.

American History is not what you've been taught in High School or even in College. Much of the truth has been hidden, skipped over, glossed over to the point of being unrecognizable, or spun to make Americans think we are the greatest nation on earth. Never mind that we perpetuated atrocities, crimes and theft against the American native population, against the slaves, against the peoples of South America, Africa, South East Asia and Asia proper, and the Middle East. Americans have killed more innocent people than all but four nations; Germany, Japan, Russia, and China. We seem to be obsessed with World Domination fully willing to support brutal dictatorships in order for our corporations to make profits at the expense of the people in the countries our corporations exploit. It's not a pretty picture.

2-19-16 Surviving solitary confinement
Surviving solitary confinement
Spending years in isolation can have a devastating effect on the mind. Writer Susie Neilson speaks to prisoners who survived, and even thrived, with the help of their imagination. Solitary confinement has been linked to a variety of profoundly negative psychological outcomes, including suicidal tendencies and spatial and cognitive distortions. Confinement-induced stress can shrink parts of the brain, including the hippocampus, which is responsible for memory, spatial orientation, and control of emotions. Prisoners often report bizarre and disturbing subjective experiences after they leave supermax. Some say the world regularly collapses in on itself. Others report they are unable to sustain ordinary conversations, or think clearly for any length of time. The psychiatrist Sandra Schank puts it this way: “It’s a standard psychiatric concept, if you put people in isolation, they will go insane.”

2-6-16 US military abuse scandal: Pentagon releases 198 prisoner photos
US military abuse scandal: Pentagon releases 198 prisoner photos
Nearly 200 photographs linked to allegations of abuse by the US military in Iraq and Afghanistan over a decade ago have been released by the Pentagon. The photos were released in response to a freedom of information request by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). The images show mainly bruises and cuts on prisoners' arms and legs. The abuse scandal erupted in 2004 when shocking photos emerged of US soldiers appearing to sexually humiliate and torture detainees in Iraq's Abu Ghraib. About 14 of the allegations were substantiated - leading to the disciplining of 65 service personnel, ranging from letters of reprimand to life imprisonment. About 42 allegations were unsubstantiated, the spokesman said. The ACLU has been fighting for more than a decade for the release of what it says are 2,000 photos documenting abuse at US detention centres. It said it would continue to fight for publication of the remaining 1,800. "The still-secret pictures are the best evidence of the serious abuses that took place in military detention centers," ACLU deputy legal director Jameel Jaffer said in a statement.

12-18-15 Victims of U.S. Experimentation
Victims of U.S. Experimentation
The syphilis experiments in Guatemala were United States-led human experiments conducted in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948, during the administration of President Truman and President Juan José Arévalo with the cooperation of some Guatemalan health ministries and officials. Doctors infected soldiers, prostitutes, prisoners and mental patients with syphilis and other sexually transmitted diseases, without the informed consent of the subjects, and treated most subjects with antibiotics. This resulted in at least 83 deaths. In October 2010, the U.S. formally apologized to Guatemala for conducting these experiments.(Webmaster's comment: Guatemala wants to compensate the families of the victims, but the U.S hasn't offered anything. Nor has it ever charged the U.S. officials and doctors involved with any crime. We'll do these crimes again too, just like Germany did them to the Jews.)

12-18-15 US President Barack Obama makes Guantanamo closure plan
US President Barack Obama makes Guantanamo closure plan
President Obama is delivering a year-end address before heading to San Bernardino to visit families bereaved by the terror attacks. The speech and the trip to California are his last scheduled appearances before going to Hawaii for holiday until the new year. Mr Obama said it was his expectation by early next year to have reduced the prison population at the camp in Cuba to below 100. He said he will present a plan to Congress to close it, keeping back the threat of using his executive powers if Congress rejects it. "Guantanamo continues to be one of the key magnets for jihadi recruitment." (Webmaster's comment: Close this example of American prison camps and torture atrocities!)

12-18-15 Is it fair to punish prisoners with horrible food?
Is it fair to punish prisoners with horrible food?
New York prisons are to stop punishing inmates with a type of food known as "nutraloaf" or "the loaf", in a change to the state's solitary confinement policy. But what's in a loaf, and is it ever fair to punish prisoners by downgrading their food? Nutraloaf. Disciplinary loaf. Prison loaf. Special management meal. The loaf. The blended and often baked block of food, served in some US prisons as a punishment for bad behaviour, comes in a number of guises. There is no single recipe. (Webmaster's comment: Americans do everything they can to assure that criminals that go into prisions will come out of prisons again as criminals!)

12-15-15 Life Behind Bars
Life Behind Bars
The padlocked, yet often productive, lives of prisoners in America. America has a prison problem. The land of the free is not only the world's largest jailer, but also dishes out sentencing lengths significantly longer than those in other developed nations. What happens between the time prisoners surrender their independence and take their next breath of freedom? Here, a look behind the bars and into the lives of America's inmates. (Webmaster's comment: Pretty pictures are not the truth. The sheer brutality of life in the American prison system is not in these pictures. Prison gangs, beatings, and rapes are not shown. Rehabilitation such as successfully used in Europe is almost unheard of. Revenge and Retaliation does not cure the crime problem, it only creates more dedicated criminals.)

12-2-15 Guantanamo Bay prisoner victim of mistaken identity, says US
Guantanamo Bay prisoner victim of mistaken identity, says US
A Guantanamo Bay prisoner locked up for 13 years has been found to be a victim of mistaken identity, originally thought to be a member of al-Qaeda. US officials said in a new report that Mustafa al-Aziz al-Shamiri was a low-level Islamic fighter rather than a significant member of the group. The 37-year-old Yemeni, who has been held without charge, appeared before a board on Tuesday. He is one of 107 prisoners at the base where nearly 50 are awaiting release. Captured in Afghanistan and imprisoned as an enemy combatant, his release has not been approved yet. (Webmaster's comment: Just another US war crimes victim.)

11-22-15 George Nakashima: Artisan imprisoned in US internment camps
George Nakashima: Artisan imprisoned in US internment camps
This week, one US mayor lauded the Japanese internment camps which imprisoned US citizens and residents during World War 2. A family that lived in such a camp responds. Mayor David Bowers of Roanoke, Virginia, doesn't want any Syrians resettled in his community. He even lauded the internment camps many Japanese Americans were confined to during World War 2. "President Franklin D Roosevelt felt compelled to sequester Japanese foreign nationals after the bombing of Pearl Harbour, and it appears that the threat of harm to America from Isis now is just as real," he wrote in a statement. Numerous people have decried the mayor for his words - including the fact that the Japanese interred in camps were US citizens, not foreign nationals. On Friday, Mr Bowers apologised. (Webmaster's comment: Just as I said only two days ago. Identified, labeled, and IMPRISONED, and all that follows. We have already moved from identifying and labeling to discussing putting innocent men, women and children in prisons based on their country of origin, race or religious beliefs. This is right out of the Nazi playbook. The Neo-Nazis, Klu Klux Klan, and other white supremacist hate groups must be getting ready to dance in the streets and start the killing. Many Americans seem to have no concept of human rights whatsoever.)

11-9-15 The US inmates charged per night in jail
The US inmates charged per night in jail
A widespread practice in the US known as "pay to stay" charges jail inmates a daily fee while they are incarcerated. For those who are in and out of the local county or city lock-ups - particularly those struggling with addiction - that can lead to sky-high debts. (Webmaster's comment: Outrageous! This is a FINE charged to a person without a court order or even necessarily being found guilty. Outrageous!)

Sioux Falls Free Thinkers enthusiastically endorse the 22 American History documentaries, 3 movies, 1 book, and 1 novel described on the following 25 pages:

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The Truth About American Prison Camps
History Movies Endorsed by Sioux Falls Free Thinkers